Beating the First-Year Blues

Everyone feels down and out sometimes.

This is just a natural part of life, and first year law students are no exception to this. Whether it be in your first few weeks of classes, halfway through the semester or even as you are leaving to go on Christmas break, pretty much all first years will at some point question what they are doing, why they are doing it, and who they are doing it for.

Chances are, you’re reading this and thinking ‘yeah this is me right now!’ Well you’re definitely not alone and lucky for you we’re here to help you out! Here are some tried and tested ideas that may prove helpful in overcoming this first-year slump. Give them a go!


Change it up

From experience, change really is as good as a holiday. If you’re feeling like you’re just going through the same motions every day, chances are you need to spice things up in your life! Break your routine and give a new sport a try, get in touch with a Monash club or try meeting new people. There’s plenty to do if you go looking!

Set yourself a challenge

One of the best ways to beat the first-year blues is to concentrate on a specific and realistic goal. Not only will you feel accomplished when its achieved, but you can also reward yourself! An example of a realistic goal is trying to do all of the readings for the week. A bad goal however, would be trying to get 100% on your assignment.

See a careers adviser

If you’re really feeling off track and questioning if law really is the right course for you, don’t hesitate to drop in and visit Career Connect at Monash. They provide free course and career advise which can be really handy to point you in the right direction.

Think about your long-term goals

Sometimes when you’re feeling down, the best thing to do is to think about the future. We all go through hard times but sometimes you just have to remember the incredibly cliché saying ‘there’s no sunshine without the rain’. Try to think about how your law degree is going to benefit you in the future and all of the opportunities it provides, rather than how much study you are drowning in study – remember this is only temporary.

Talk to someone

Often we feel much better after we have vented all of our worries and concerns to somebody. A good rant may just be what you need. Find somebody you trust, whether that be a family member, a good friend or somebody independent of your personal life such as a counsellor. Sit down and talk with them about how you are feeling. You might not have figured things out by the end of it, but they may offer you the direction or reassurance you need.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

If you are really struggling to stay afloat, or you feel as though your mental health is collapsing, please please please don’t be afraid to ask for help! Monash has plenty of support practices in place to help you get through this. Whether it be seeking special consideration for your upcoming assignment, or going to visit Monash counselling services, these services are all there for you to utilise free of charge and it is all very accessible.

Hopefully these tips have provided you with some idea of what you can do to smash these first-year blues out of the park! Below we have a list of valuable resources and contacts that may prove helpful in moving forward.

 

Resources

Monash Careers Connect

For all things careers, Careers Connect is your way to go!

Either pop in to see them on the bottom floor of Campus Centre or call 9905 3151

Monash University Counselling Services

Open 8am-5pm every weekday

Drop in at 21 Chancellors Walk, Campus Centre (Clayton Campus) or call 9905 3020 to book in a free appointment.

Headspace

If you would like to chat to somebody outside of uni grounds headspace is a great resource designed specifically for youths struggling with mental health.

The best way to get in touch is by calling 1800 650 890

Written by Claudia Opie

Doubt about your Degree: Is it too late to be having Second Thoughts?

I spent all of High School knowing I was going to Law School. That’s right. I was that really extra kid on Career Day who knew exactly what grown-up job I wanted and how to get there. But once the excitement of actually getting in and going to endless social events wore off, then the dread began to take over.

I’m pretty sure I’ve had an existential crisis every semester about whether or not I belonged in Law. I would begin the semester motivated to attend every class and do all the readings, but with every lecture that flew over my head and for every mediocre grade, fear and anxiety would start to kick in.

“Fear would taunt me into believing that the very thing I’ve spent my life working towards was the wrong path, or that others would think I wasn’t smart enough to hack it. I dreaded the idea that I’d racked up thousands of dollars in student loans for no reason and would have no job to pay it off.”

What made it worse was that everyone else seemed to be coping really well, getting better grades, and being selected for legal jobs while I was constantly questioning if I was even cut out to be a lawyer or if I should just cut my losses and switch degrees.

But after getting real with many of my close friends, I realised that at least 80% of them have had doubts about whether they chose the right degree. I have friends that are only here because they got the ATAR and didn’t know what else to study. Others spent years trying to transfer into Law only to transfer back out again. Many people experienced the frustration of investing hours into studying, only to still receive average marks. In fact, the very people who I thought were having it easy were the ones freaking out the most.

Here’s the thing: You’re not a failure because you have doubts about studying law. It doesn’t mean you’re not smart enough or qualified enough. It doesn’t mean you’re a cop out. It just means your passion lies elsewhere. You might not know exactly what that is yet but don’t doubt that you have very unique talents and abilities.  You have to trust that if you’re here, and you’ve made it this far, it’s for a reason.

Next Steps

Sleep on it.

Don’t make any major life decisions when you’re feeling overly emotional. Assess if these feelings are only coming up because of a bad grade, you don’t know how to do the Corps assignment, or because exams are coming and you haven’t studied properly. If those stressful times or that horrendous unit is over, and you start to feel fulfilled and motivated to become a lawyer again, then the anxiety was probably just tricking you into thinking you’re not capable.

Be honest with good people.

Get real with your friends about how you feel. Chances are they will have also felt the same doubt you do. It’ll make you feel less alone. Seek advice from those who know you best. Some people just have a knack for seeing the best in us and where we thrive. They’ll help you figure out where you’re supposed to go.

Begin to explore your other hobbies.

Figure out what your passions are. Figure out what breaks your heart about this world and how you want to change it. If having a law degree is the thing that will help you achieve your passion, then just hold on to this bigger purpose while you stick it out.

Map it out.

Look at the course map and see how many years you have left. If it’s just a couple more semesters to go, then it may be worth sticking it out. Look ahead and ask yourself: what do I want to be doing in 5 years’ time? Adjust your trajectory as necessary.

Take a break.

Maybe all you need is a breather from the heavy law readings and assignments. Many people have deferred a semester or even a whole year of Law to chill out and assess their options. There is no shame in taking time off to look after yourself and pursue other interests. The break might motivate you to come back stronger than ever or it might be the confirmation you need that law isn’t your thing.

There’s nothing wrong with realising this degree isn’t it for you. I don’t have all the answers and I can’t tell you whether to stay or go. But when anxiety whispers you’ve stuffed up and it’s too late to change, remember that all things work out for good-no matter what decision you make. Your time here is not wasted, and the things you’re going through now will have a purpose.

For anyone on the brink of their existential crisis or for those who are currently in it, welcome to the club. Everyone feels lost sometimes, but take heart- this could just be the launch pad into the life you’re supposed to have.

Written by Ashley Chow (Co-founder)